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Kim Dotcom Embraces DRM January 22, 2013

Posted by Bill Rosenblatt in DRM, New Zealand, Services.
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Kim Dotcom launched a new cloud file storage service, the New Zealand-based Mega, last weekend on the one-year anniversary of the shutdown of his previous site, the notorious MegaUpload.  (The massive initial interest in the site* prevented me from trying out the new service until today.)

Mega encrypts users’ files, using what looks like a content key (using AES-128) protected by 2048-bit RSA asymmetric-key encryption.  It derives the latter keys from users’ passwords and other pseudo-random data.  Downloading a file from a Mega account requires knowing either the password that was used to generate the RSA key (i.e., logging in to the account used to upload the file) or the key itself.

Hmm.  Content encrypted with symmetric keys that in turn are protected by asymmetric keys… sounds quite a bit like DRM, doesn’t it?

Well, not quite.  While DRM systems assume that file owners won’t want to publish keys used to encrypt the files, Mega not only allows but enables you to publish your files’ keys.  Mega lets you retrieve the key for a given file in the form of a URL; just right-click on the file you want and select “Get link.”   (Here‘s a sample.)  You can put the resulting URL into a blog post, tweet, email message, or website featuring banner ads for porn and mail-order brides.

(And of course, unlike DRM systems, once you obtain a key and download a file, it’s yours in unencrypted form to do with as you please.  The encryption isn’t integrated into a secure player app.)

Yet in practical terms, Mega is really no different from file-storage services that let users publish URLs to files they store — examples of which include RapidShare, 4Shared, and any of dozens of file transfer services (YouSendIt, WhaleMail, DropSend, Pando, SendUIt, etc.).

Mega touts its use of encryption as a privacy benefit.  What it really offers is privacy from the kinds of piracy monitoring services that media companies use to generate takedown notices — an application of encryption that hardcore pirates have used and that Kim Dotcom purports to “take … out to the mainstream.”  It will be impossible to use content identification technologies, such as fingerprinting, to detect the presence of copyrighted materials on Mega’s servers.  RapidShare, for example, analyzes third-party links to files on its site for potential infringements; Mega can’t do any such thing, by design.

Mega’s use of encryption also plays into the question of whether it could ever be held secondarily liable for its users’ infringements under laws such as DMCA 512 in the United States.  The Beltway tech policy writer Paul Sweeting wrote an astute analysis of Mega’s chances against the DMCA over the weekend.

Is Kim Dotcom simply thumbing his nose at Big Media again?  Or is he seriously trying to make Mega a competitor to legitimate, prosaic file storage services such as DropBox?  The track records of services known for piracy trying to go “legit” are not encouraging — just ask Bram Cohen (BitTorrent Entertainment Network) or Global Gaming Factory (purchasers of The Pirate Bay’s assets).  Still, this is one to watch as the year unfolds.

*Or, just possibly, server meltdowns faked to generate mountains of credulous hype?

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