Author Archives: Bill Rosenblatt

Copyright and Technology 2018 Keynote Speaker: Jonathan Taplin

We’ve got an exciting keynote speaker lined up for Copyright and Technology 2018 on January 17: Jonathan Taplin, Director Emeritus of the USC Annenberg Innovation Lab and author of Move Fast and Break Things: How Google, Facebook and Amazon Have Cornered Culture and Undermined Democracy. Like Jaron Lanier’s Who Owns the Future?, Taplin extrapolates the effects of those Internet […]

Announcing the Copyright and Technology 2018 Conference

I’m pleased to announce that our next Copyright and Technology conference will be on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 at Fordham Law School, on Fordham’s Lincoln Center campus on the upper west side of Manhattan. The conference is now in its ninth year, and once again I’m proud to be producing it in partnership with the Copyright […]

New Proposed Legislation Sets Up Showdown Over Online U.S. Music Rights Database

An effort is brewing in Washington to get an authoritative online database of music rights information built for the United States. It started last week as a bill called the Transparency in Music Licensing and Ownership Act. (It has neither a catchy acronym nor even a bill number at this time of writing, so we’ll just call […]

Copyright Office Releases Results of Section 1201 Study

Late last month, the United States Copyright Office published the results of a study on Section 1201 (17 U.S.C. § 1201), the section of U.S. copyright law that makes it a violation to hack DRM systems and other content access and copy controls.  Section 1201 was enacted in 1998 as part of the Digital Millennium […]

Setting the Agenda for Copyright and Technology 2018 Conference

Summer’s here and the time is right for planning the agenda for the next Copyright and Technology Conference — which will be in NYC in late January 2018 (exact date TBD), now in its ninth year and once again in partnership with the Copyright Society of the USA. For those of you who have attended […]

Libraries: Be Careful What You Wish For

Last week we discussed the new “cost-per-circulation” (CPC) model for public libraries — in which they can make e-books available to patrons and pay the publisher per “loan” instead of paying fixed fees to “acquire” titles as if they were print books (the “pretend it’s print” or PIP model). HarperCollins has just become the first […]

Hoopla Digital and HarperCollins Disrupt Library E-Lending

An announcement this week by hoopla digital and HarperCollins augurs big changes in the ways that public libraries make e-books available. It sets the stage for realignment of the relationships between publishers and libraries, and it could have longer-term ripple effects on the entire e-book market. For more than a decade, public libraries have been […]